DECIPHERING THE DENGUE ENIGMA: UNRAVELING CLINICAL, HEMATOLOGICAL, AND SEROLOGICAL SIGNATURES IN RAWALPINDI, PAKISTAN

Main Article Content

Dua Zhaira
Hasnat Mubarik
Wajiha Khan Anwar
Ismat Zhaira
Maryam Khalid
Dr. Hira Muzzamal
Muhammad Sohaib Hassan
Farwa Abbas
Nadia Sadiq

Keywords

Dengue virus, NS1, DHF

Abstract

Dengue virus produce by the bite of the mosquito. This virus is RNA single stranded. Severe illness has the symptoms of headache, fever, joint pain and rashes. Drinking fluid can help to cure from this disease so, Recovery generally takes two to seven days. This study was carried out at District Head Quarters hospitals which is located in Punjab province, Pakistan through the duration since July 2021 to Dec 2021. Those patients who visit the DHQ hospital will be enrolled as cases while con. A cross sectional study comprised of 166 dengue patients. All the subjects were enrolled on January 2022 at District Head Quarters hospital located in Punjab province, Pakistan. Data was analyzed on SPSS IBM version22.Continuous variables are normalized by mean and standard deviation, while categorical variables are described by frequency distribution and graph pad prism help us to find the percentage of IgG, IgM and NS1. In our research we took age, Diagnoses, IgM, IgG, HCT, PLT and TLC. Some patients through suffering from dengue fever continue to develop dengue hemorrhagic fever so in our diagnoses research we have 44.2% of DHF the study of dengue virus was divided into positive and negative according to NS1, IgM and IgG. In case of NS1 we have high rate of positive value (44.8%) and low rate of negative value (6.4%). In IgG we have 80.12% negative value and 19.88% positive value. In IgM we have 40.36% positive and 59.64% negative value. In descriptive analysis of PLT mean value is 59.29, HCT mean is 39.32 and TLC mean is 79.04. The significant of correlation of PLT and HCT is 0.05. To identify the disease, we use new molecular techniques. It has offered a fresh possibility for primary identification, even though they remain incomplete due to their expenses and standards. The use of antiviral drug medicines to cure this virus fever is still being investigated.

Abstract 303 | Pdf Downloads 15

References

1. Waggoner, J.J., et al., Viremia and Clinical Presentation in Nicaraguan Patients Infected Wi1. Waggoner, J.J., et al., Viremia and Clinical Presentation in Nicaraguan Patients Infected With Zika Virus, Chikungunya Virus, and Dengue Virus. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 2016. 63(12): p. 1584- 1590.
2. Bhatt, S., et al., The global distribution and burden of dengue. Nature, 2013. 496(7446): p.504–507.
3. Brady, O.J., et al., Refining the global spatial limits of dengue virus transmission by evidence-based consensus. PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 2012. 6(8): p. e1760.
4. Tjaden, N.B., et al., Extrinsic Incubation Period of Dengue: Knowledge, Backlog, and Applications of Temperature Dependence. Plos Neglected Tropical Diseases, 2013. 7(6): p. 5
5. Siler, J.F., M.W. Hall, and A.P. Hitchens, Dengue: Its history, epidemiology, mechanism of transmission, etiology, clinical manifestations, immunity and prevention.1926, Manila: Bureau of Science.
6. Watts, D.M., et al., Effect of Temperature on the vector efficiency of Aedes aegypti for Dengue2 virus. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 1987. 36(1): p. 143-152.
7. Carrington, L.B., et al., Fluctuations at low mean temperatures accelerate dengue virus transmission by Aedes aegypti. PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 2013. 7(4): p. e2190.
8. Lambrechts, L., et al., Impact of daily temperature fluctuations on dengue virus transmission by Aedes aegypti. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2011. 108(18): p. 7460-7465.
9. Anderson, J.R. and R. Rico-Hesse, Aedes aegypti vectorial capacity is determined by the infecting genotype of dengue virus. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 2006.75(5): p. 886-892.
10. Ye, Y.X.H., et al., Wolbachia Reduces the Transmission Potential of Dengue- Infected Aedes Aegypti. PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 2015. 9(6): p. e0003894.
11. Duong, V., et al., Asymptomatic humans transmit dengue virus to mosquitoes. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, 2015. 112(47): p. 14688– 14693.
12. Nguyen, N.M., et al., Host and viral features of human dengue cases shape the population of infected and infectious Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2013. 110(22): p. 9072-9077.
13. Gubler, D.J., et al., Viraemia in patients with naturally acquired dengue infection. Bulletin of the World Health Organisation, 1981. 59: p. 623-630.
14. Basurko, C., et al., Estimating the Risk of Vertical Transmission of Dengue: A Prospective Study. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 2018. 98(6): p.1826-1832.
15. Mazarin, N., J.M. Rosenthal, and J. Devenge, Mother infant dengue transmission during the 2009-2010 dengue epidemic: Observation of four cases. Archives De Pediatrie, 20141. Waggoner,

16. J.J., et al., Viremia and Clinical Presentation in Nicaraguan Patients Infected With Zika Virus, Chikungunya Virus, and Dengue Virus. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 2016.63(12): p. 1584-1590.
17. Sinhabahu, V.P., R. Sathananthan, and G.N. Malavige, Perinatal transmission ofdengue: a case report. BMC Research Notes, 2014. 7(795).
18. Basurko, C., et al., Maternal and foetal consequences of dengue fever during pregnancy. European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, 2009. 147(1): p. 29-32.
19. Pouliot, S.H., et al., Maternal Dengue and Pregnancy Outcomes A Systematic Review. Obstetrical & Gynecological Survey, 2010. 65(2): p. 107-118.
20. Trpis, M., et al., DIEL PERIODICITY IN LANDING OF AEDES-AEGYPTI ON MAN.Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 1973. 48(5): p. 623-629.20] Scott, T.W., et al., Longitudinal studies of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) in Thailand and Puerto Rico: Blood feeding frequency. Journal of Medical Entomology, 2000. 37(1): p. 89-101.
21. Scott, T.W., et al., Longitudinal studies of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) in Thailand and Puerto Rico: Blood feeding frequency. Journal of Medical Entomology,2000. 37(1): p. 89-101.

Most read articles by the same author(s)