PREVALENCE OF ORTHOSTATIC HYPOTENSION AND RISK OF FALL AMONG ELDER POPULATION IN OLD AGE HOME

Main Article Content

Zainab Khan
Moater Iftikhar
Aleena Qadeer
Maryam
Mehwish

Keywords

ELDERS, old age home, orthostatic hypertension, risk of fall

Abstract

Background: Orthostatic hypotension is a condition described by the American Societies of Neurology and Autonomy in which there is a 20mmHg decrease in systolic blood pressure or 10mmhg decrease in diastolic blood pressure within three minutes as a person stands up. Orthostatic hypotension causes pre-syncope within seconds of standing requiring a patient to sit down immediately decline in condition can be caused secondary to systemic illness or autonomic failure. The most controversial risk factor related to falls is orthostatic hypotension. Recent studies have shown that OH is the leading cause of morbidity related to accidental falls which increase as the person ages.
Aims and objectives: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of orthostatic hypotension and the risk of falls among the elderly population in old-age homes.

Study design: A cross-sectional study


Place and Duration: This data was collected from Old Age Homes (Aafiyat Faisalabad, Pakistan), (Old Age Home M.B.Din, Pakistan), ( Daar-ul-Sawab Old Age Home Lahore, Pakistan). The study was completed within 4 months after the approval of the synopsis.
Methodology: The data of 114 participants was collected. The Orthostatic Hypotension Symptoms Questionnaire was used to assess the prevalence of orthostatic hypotension and the risk of falls among the elderly population in old-age homes.
Results: The study included participants with a mean age of 62.45 ± 7.67 years, comprising 52.6% males and 47.4% females. Analysis revealed a moderate prevalence of orthostatic hypotension (OH) with a mean ± SD score of 16.09 ± 3.26 on the OH symptoms questionnaire. The participants of this study had a moderate Risk of Falls (ROF) with a mean ± SD score of 16.09 ± 3.26 on the Fall assessment part of the OH symptoms questionnaire. The correlation between OH and ROF was found to be strongly positive with a correlation coefficient of 0.892 and a very significant p-value of 0.000.
Conclusion: In conclusion, our study demonstrates a moderate prevalence of orthostatic hypotension as well as a moderate risk of falls among elderly individuals residing in old-age homes.
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