C-REACTIVE PROTEIN LEVELS AS PREDICTORS OF COVID-19 SEVERITY: A RETROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

Main Article Content

Aruna Rani Behera
Sangeeta Panigrahy
Pulavarthi Samatha
Basava Siva Prasad Reddy

Keywords

COVID‐19, Prognostic marker, Inflammatory response, Disease severity, Disease progression, Serum marker

Abstract

Background: Since its emergence in China in December 2019, SARS-CoV-2 has posed significant global health challenges due to its rapid spread and high mortality. Predicting COVID-19 severity remains difficult, with some suggesting C-reactive protein (CRP) as a potential early marker for severe cases. This study examines the relationship between CRP levels and COVID-19 severity to better manage the disease and aimed to investigate CRP’s utility in prognosticating COVID-19 to improve patient outcomes The study has included patients of more than 18 years diagnosed with COVID-19 infection by RT-PCR method and admitted in either ward or ICU or having any comorbid conditions eg: Diabetes, Hypertension.


Materials and Methods: Analysis regarding serum CRP with the severity of disease was done. Among all statistical tests, Chi-square tests were used where P <0.05 was taken as significant. This two-month retrospective study at Great Eastern Medical School and Hospital, Andhra Pradesh, analyzed data from 152 COVID-19 patients confirmed by RT-PCR. Data on demographics, clinical histories, and CRP levels determined by nephelometry were extracted from the hospital’s Laboratory Information System, following ethical approval.


Results: Analysis of 152 COVID-19 patients showed those with CRP levels >100 mg/L had a higher likelihood of severe disease. The values were categorised based on the values we received after the investigation. And the patients were suffering from more severe conditions who had >100mg/L of CRP values. The severity was determined based on the symptoms and signs patients presented during their stay in hospital. The majority (76.3%) had non-severe cases, with a significant 23.7% presenting with severe symptoms. CRP values ranged, with most patients having levels between 8.01-50.0mg/L or <8mg/L, correlating to illness severity.


Conclusion: High CRP levels may serve as an early indicator of potential disease severity in COVID-19, aiding timely intervention. While limited by sample size and being a single-center retrospective analysis, these findings call for larger, multicenter studies with repeated CRP measures for validation. Monitoring high-CRP patients closely is recommended.

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