“TO STUDY THE PREVALENCE OF AETIOLOGIES ACUTE UNDIFFERENTIATED FEBRILE ILLNESSES OF THE PATIENTS AT A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE IN UTTAR PRADESH, INDIA”.

Main Article Content

Vikas Mishra
Deepika Shukla
Firoza Bano
Sheela Sharma
Sanjay Nigam
Shrawan Kumar
R Sujatha
Nashra Afaq
Madhu Yadav
Gaurav Oberoi
Qazi Rais Ahmed

Keywords

AUFI, Dengue, Leptospira, Chikungunia, Scrub typhus, Malaria, Typhoid

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: The acute undifferentiated febrile illness (AUFI) connotes fever of <14 days duration without any evidence of organ or system specific aetiology. In the majority of hospitals, acute undifferentiated febrile illness (AUFI) is a prevalent clinical condition. If the cause of the fever is not identified and treated effectively as soon as possible, it could be fatal.


AIM AND OBJECTIVES: To study the Prevalence of Aetiologies acute undifferentiated febrile illnesses of the patients at a tertiary care centre in Uttar Pradesh, India.


MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a Hospital based cross sectional study conducted in the Department of Microbiology at Rama Medical College Hospital & Research Centre, Mandhana, Kanpur. The study was carried out during the monsoon and post monsoon of the year 2022 for a period of 6 months from July 2022 to December 2022. A total of the 1520 clinical samples were recorded out of which there were 106 suspected cases. Sampling method was used and allin-patients fulfilling the AUFI definition were included. All in-patients with <14 days of fever with no localising source of infection were included in the study. The suspected cases was tested for various seriological tests. Diagnosis was confirmed by suitable laboratory tests after exhaustive clinical examination.


RESULTS: In the present study the ratio of Male 60 (56.6%) was found to be more as compared to that of Female 46 (43.3%) with the maximum number of cases recorded in the age group of 20-40 years of age and least in the age group above 61 years of age. The most common cause of AUFI was the Dengue with the prevalence rate of 12.2% followed by Typhoid 7.5% , Enteric fever was found to be 7.5% Scrub typus 1.88%, and least for Malaria 0. 9%. It was also noted that there were no positive cases observed for Chikungunia and leptospira. It was also observed that the fever was the most common among all, followed by anaemia, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly with the maximum number of cases observed in the month of August to October.


CONCLUSION: When prioritising clinical and diagnostic workup and starting the appropriate empirical and supportive therapy, doctors are guided by their understanding of the local aetiology of AUFI. As the prevalence of multiple infections rises, complete clinical and diagnostic investigation for likely pathogens must be taken into account in AUFI patients who are not responding to treatment

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