IN-VITRO AMYLASE AND UREASE INHIBITORY ACTIVITY OF MORINGA OLEIFERA LEAVES AND CHENOPODIUM QUINOA SEEDS

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Zerfishan Riaz
Syed Muhammad Ali Shah
Sabira Sultana
Kashif Ali
Naheed Akhtar
Rizwana Dilshad
Faheem Hadi
Sameera Khurshid
Dur E Nayab
Shehla Akbar
Palwasha Khan
Nayla Javed
Farzana Parveen
Hafiz Saqib Zaka
Nadia Rai
Rabia Tasneem
Arfa Sharif
Anam Saleem
Aqsa Irum
Ammara Choudhry

Keywords

Moringa oleifera leaves, chenopodium quinoa seeds, amylase inhibition, urease inhibition

Abstract

Amylase and urease are two important enzymes and drug targets in crosstalk, with oxidative stress playing a vital role in developing and originating diseases, including diabetes mellitus. In diabetic patients, alpha-amylase inhibition is a vital therapeutic target in regulating increased postprandial blood glucose levels. Increased urea production increases the local pH and produces a favorable environment for bacteria like helicobacter pylori, leading to peptic ulcer and stone formation. Despite the latest innovations in modern medicine, medicinal plants and natural treatments are getting more attention. Herbs have been used to cure numerous diseases for a long. However, scientists have shown more interest in extracting herbal bioactive compounds and their pharmacological properties because of their side effects and consumption of synthesized medicines. This study investigated the amylase and urease inhibitory activity of Moringa oleifera leaves and Chenopodium quinoa seeds by inhibitory enzyme assay, which shows excellent results. The methanolic and aqueous extracts of M. oleifera leaves and C. quinoa seeds were prepared to check their enzyme inhibitory activity. It showed significant enzyme inhibitory action against urease and alpha-amylase, respectively. Consumption of these edible medicinal plants illustrates therapeutic efficacy against gastrointestinal ulcers and postprandial hyperglycemia.  The isolation of valuable amylase and urease inhibitors might achieve through assay-guided phytochemical analysis.

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