COMPARISON THE PREVALENCE AND ASSOCIATED RISK FACTORS OF ILIOTIBIAL BAND SYNDROME AMONG CYCLISTS AND RUNNERS. A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY

Main Article Content

Monika Sharma
Afzal Raza Khan
Airam Hussain

Keywords

Iliotibial Band Syndrome, Runners, Cyclist, Ober's Test, Renne Test, Nobel Test

Abstract

Introduction: Iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome is a common consequence of long-distance running, particularly on gently inclined ground. ITB syndrome may also result from an abrupt increase in physical activity. Iliotibial band friction syndrome is an overuse injury usually seen in long distance runners, cyclists, and military personnel. I.T.B. syndrome is responsible for around 22% of all leg and foot injuries, according to recent studies. ITB Syndrome affects between 5-14% of runners, making it one of the most common causes of lateral knee pain. Typically, the underlying reasons of I.T.B.S. are complicated. Iliotibial band (ITB) injuries are a common consequence of long-distance running, particularly increasing. New evidence suggests that repeated compression of tissues may cause inflammation, but other explanations surrounding the genesis of the disease remain feasible. New evidences suggests that repeated compression of tissues may cause inflammation. Limited studied have been done, so limited literature is available to assess the prevalence of ITB syndrome in cyclist or other sports athlete other than runners. Therefore, our aim is to compare the prevalence and associated risk of Iliotibial Band syndrome among Cyclists and Runners.


Methodology: A cross sectional study was performed in Greater Noida city. The purposive sampling method was used to collect samples and requested to sign the consent and agreement of participation. They were then assigned to the Group A(runners) or Group B (cyclists). All the procedures and tests were explained to the subjects with all the effects. All the participants were requested to complete the demographic variables (age, weight, height, level of activity, and medical records). The participants then assess for Iliotibial Band Syndrome by performing all 3 tests (Ober's Test, Renne's Test and Noble Compression Test) and results were recorded for all participants. A comparison was made in both the groups for the co-relation of Iliotibial Band Syndrome.


Results: A prevalence of 46.6% runners (n=14) was reported positive in Group A (sample size 30) whereas only 30% cyclists (n=9) were reported positive in Group B (sample size 30) for Iliotibial Band Syndrome. For the Ober's Test results, Renne's Test results, Noble Compression results the results were same as 14:09 for Runners and Cyclist. Most runners were more affected than cyclist. There is a positive co-relation seen in all the test compared with the Age, weight, and height.


Conclusion: A moderate prevalence of ITB syndrome was observed among cyclist when compare with runners. The significant risk factors included age, level of activity, body mass index (BMI).

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