THORACIC SPINAL ANESTHESIA (TSA) RESULTS, IN UPPER ABDOMINAL SURGERIES

Main Article Content

Imran Hafeez
Kelash Kumar
Khawar Aziz
Zaheer Ahmed
Imran Ali
Ahmeduddin Soomro

Keywords

Thoracic Spinal Anesthesia, Abdominal Surgeries

Abstract

Introduction: Thoracic spinal anesthesia (TSA) is a valuable treatment that can be used for a variety of surgical approaches. The surgeon and the team should be aware that the choice of patient is crucial and that a thorough history and physical examination will determine who is eligible.


Objective: To determine the application of thoracic spinal anesthesia (TSA) in upper abdominal surgeries.


Study design: A cross-sectional study


Place and Duration: This study was conducted in King Abdullah Medical City, Makkah, from May 2021 to May 2022.


Methodology: This study evaluated 17 cases of TSA in admitted patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery and other upper abdominal procedures. Despite its rarity, thoracic spinal anesthesia is proven to be a harmless and current method for a variety of procedures. The treatment has been found to benefit these patients by maintaining hemodynamic stability and decreasing the negative effects associated with general anesthesia.


Results: In this study, there were 10 (58.8%) males and 7 (41.2%) females. The mean age, weight, height, and BMI were 36.71.28 ± 13.9 years, 45.7 ± 4.9 kg, 161.67± 4.1 cm, and 21.1± 3.2 respectively. Two patients out of 17 developed hypotension; one patient reported abdominal pain; and five patients developed pain in the tip of the shoulder intraoperatively. None of the required conversions into general anesthesia were performed; nausea and vomiting were reported in two patients, and none of the patients reported any itching in the study.


Conclusion: With sufficient sedation, thoracic and spinal anesthesia can be administered to normal and even high-risk patients without substantial intraoperative problems and with better postoperative pain control. Giving thoracic spinal anesthesia may be an additional option for certain common surgeries because of enhanced patient safety, a shorter postoperative care stay, and better postoperative pain reduction.

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